Observatory Logo


From: 	 TerryMoselat signaol.com
Subject: Nova Cygni, Close asteroid pass
Date: 	19 March 2007 17:34:24 GMT

Hi all,
 
1. NOVA CYGNI: As promised in my last email, here's a chart for Nova
Cygni, position shown at the tip of the arrow. It lies approx 1/3 of the
way from Gamma to Alpha Cygni. Stars are shown to magnitude 10. Latest
estimates suggest it is about magnitude 8, so it may not brighten any
further.



2. (From the BAA)  Close Approach of Asteroid 2006 VV2

Asteroid 2006 VV2 passes close to the Earth at the end of March and the
early part of April.  At its closest, on March 31, it will be 0.0226 AU
away (8.8 lunar distances). This will be the closest known approach by
an object this intrinsically bright until May 2036, when binary asteroid
(66391) 1999 KW4 (H=16.4) approaches within 6 lunar distances. 
Observers should be able to see it through modest telescopes as it
reaches 10th magnitude on March 31st and April 1st.

Between 01:00 and 03:00 UT on March 29 the asteroid passes within 25 arc
min of galaxies M82 and M81 and between 19:00 and 21:00 UT on March 31
it approaches within 3 degrees of galaxies M105, M96 and M95.  A list of
close appulses is given below, along with the details of a possible
occultation event visible from the UK on the evening of March 31.    
2006 VV2 will be a very strong radar target and observations are
scheduled at Goldstone (March 27, 30, and April 1-3) and Arecibo (March
31 and April 1). VV2's physical properties are unknown, but its absolute
magnitude of 16.7 suggests a diameter within a factor of two of about 22
km and there is roughly a 1- in- 6 chance that it is a binary system.
Astrometric and photometric data are requested in support of the radar
observations.

Orbital elements
Epoch 2007 Apr. 10.0 
Semimajor axis, a		2.3913823 AU
Eccentricity, e			0.6029924   
Inclination of orbit, i		23.63379 deg
Argument of perihelion		144.91495 deg
Long. ascending node		10.04975 deg
Mean anomaly, M			9.67407 deg
Period of orbit, P		3.70 years (1350.7 days)
Perihelion distance		0.949 AU 
Aphelion distance		3.833 AU
Absolute magnitude, H		16.7

Ephemeris
   Date     UT    RA (J2000) Decl.    Delta    r      El.  Ph.    V    "/min   P.A.

2007 03 25 0000  00 56 22  +82 13.6   0.065  0.989   80.8  95.5  14.2   7.76  037.1
2007 03 26 0000  02 24 30  +84 43,2   0.056  0.993   83.6  93.2  13.7  10.28  058.7
2007 03 27 0000  06 11 45  +85 13.2   0.047  0.997   87.5  89.8  13.2  14.41  115.0
2007 03 28 0000  08 53 39  +80 11.0   0.039  1.001   93.2  84.6  12.6  21.14  154.8
2007 03 29 0000  09 49 31  +70 20.8   0.031  1.005  101.9  76.3  11.9  32.23  168.1
2007 03 30 0000  10 14 23  +54 42.0   0.026  1.010  115.2  63.5  11.0  48.43  173.4
2007 03 31 0000  10 28 10  +32 31.9   0.023  1.014  132.6  46.4  10.3  61.58  175.6
2007 04 01 0000  10 36 54  +08 27.3   0.024  1.019  146.9  32.4  10.0  56.00  176.4
2007 04 02 0000  10 42 58  -10 35.2   0.028  1.024  149.6  29.6  10.3  39.11  176.5

Appulses
2007 Mar 28 20:04  27 UMa (V=5.1), Asteroid (V=12.0) 6' west of star
2007 Mar 29 01:20  Messier 82 (V=9.2), Asteroid (V=11.8) 25' east of galaxy
2007 Mar 29 02:20  Messier 81 (V=7.8), Asteroid (V=11.8) 15' east of galaxy
2007 Mar 30 19:51  bet LMi (V=4.2), Asteroid (V=10.4) 15' west of star
2007 Mar 30 22:42  30 LMi (V=4.7), Asteroid (V=10.3) 22' east of star

OCCULTATION !!! 2007 Mar 31 20:38  HIP 51892 (V=7.25), Asteroid (V=10.0)
   This is a K2-type star and the track crosses the UK passing Ayr,
Chester, Shrewsbury, Gloucester and Salisbury.  The exact position is
uncertain so observers within say 50-100 km either side of the nominal
position may witness a positive event.   The duration of any event is
expected to be less than 0.2 sec but this can be recorded using a video
camera given that the star is so bright.  The drop in brightness is
expected to be close to 3 magnitudes.     Roger Dymock, Director
Asteroids and Remote Planets Section

IRELAND: Given the present uncertainty in the track, there is a slight
chance that the extreme ENE coast of N Ireland could witness this
occultation - the NE coasts of Co Antrim & Co Down lie within about 100
km of the track. If the asteroid is a binary, then the chances of an
occultation visible from here are slightly greater.    Any such
observation would produce really valuable information, so anyone with
suitable equipment should prepare to try to record it if at all
possible.  I'll give an update if further information becomes available.

Further detail can be found on the Asteroid and Remote Planets Section
website.

Clear Skies,
 
Terry Moseley

---------

Last Revised: 2007 March 20th
Go to HOME PageHome Page