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From: TerryMoselaol.com
Date: Sun, 29 May 2005 20:17:14 EDT
Subject: Asteroid Corvan, Venus, Mars

Hi all,

1. I'm absolutely delighted to be able to tell you that my old friend & 
observing colleague Pat Corvan, just retired from Armagh Planetarium where I'm sure 
many of you met him, has been honoured by the IAU with the naming of an 
asteroid after him. The citation reads:

"(8515) Corvan = 1991 RJ. Discovered 1991 Sept. 4 by R. H. McNaught at Siding 
Spring. Patrick G. Corvan (b. 1940) has links with Armagh Observatory dating 
back to his schooldays.  He is an avid observer whose enthusiasm for astronomy 
is readily communicated to others. His book and slide collections, as well as 
stories about the astronomers who have worked at or visited Armagh, are much 
in demand".

Once again that sly old 'Vulpecula' John McConnell (aka 9929 McConnell) had a 
hand in the process - well done John!

The award is richly deserved, as Pat has devoted almost all his private life, 
and a large part of his working life, to astronomy, and there's very little 
that he doesn't know about great astronomers, both Irish and others!

I spent many enjoyable & rewarding nights with Pat, and the other Pat '2602 
Moore' (now sir Pat, of course!) at the 10" Grubb refractor at Armagh 
Observatory. 

2. Venus is now slowly creeping out from the Sun, low down in the NW in the 
evening twilight. Look about 30 degrees (a bit more than the length of the 
'Plough' which is 25 deg) below and well right of Saturn on 30 May; that distance 
decreases gradually, reaching about 25 degrees by 3 June. If you can't spot it 
easily, look out for it on 8 June, when it will lie about 5 deg below right 
of a nice young thin crescent Moon.

3. Meanwhile Mars is brightening rapidly in the morning sky, and it also has 
a close pass by the Moon, in this case a thick waning crescent, on the morning 
of 31 May: look low down in the East at about 03.30 BST, just over 3 deg 
above and left of the Moon. Mars will be magnitude 0.5, a bit brighter than 
Antares, which will be low down in the SSW at that time.

Clear Skies,

Terry Moseley


Hi all,

I've just heard from Prof Alan Fitzsimmons at QUB that in fact two other 
local astronomers were also honoured by the IAU with asteroid names: Dr Apostolis 
(Tolis) Christou at Armagh Observatory, and Dr Stephen Lowry at QUB.

Congratulations to them both (and also to my informant.....)

Clear Skies,

Terry Moseley

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