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Jets

Ibrahim Abdalla, originally from Sudan, visited the Observatory for two months after completing his PhD in Loughborough. His expertise in computational fluid dynamics was exploited by Michael Smith. Techniques to run and explore the nature of adiabatic magnetohydrodynamic jets were investigated with the ZEUS code on the local supercomputer, FORGE. Problems associated with incorporating the magnetic field were solved and the code is now being employed by the Lindsay Scholar, Anthony Moraghan.

An INTAS-funded European collaboration with astronomers based in Armenia, Russia, Germany and Spain got underway. The partners are the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg, the Special Astrophysical Observatory in Russia, Byurakan Observatory in Armenia and Calar Alto Observatory in Spain. They have begun to study some specific regions containing multiple jets. The spectroscopic methods reveal the radial velocity across and along the jet flows, providing a superb view of how a jet propagates. The plan is to further investigate the environments of young stars by using sophisticated observing methods to study the causes and effects of protostellar outflows.

Simulations of jets were employed to interpret star forming environments (see Figure 7). With Alex Rosen (Dublin City University), Michael Smith has continued his exploration of three dimensional hydrodynamic simulations. The series of papers was extended to include fast and slow precession, and a web page updated to present a complete archive of all the relevant movies which demonstrate the evolution of jets (see http://star.arm.ac.uk/mds/Jets/jets.html). Predictions for the Spitzer Space Telescope were also made, and work is starting on a detailed interpretation of the first Spitzer data with Alberto Noriega-Crespo (Pasadena). Time on the Spitzer telescope was awarded to a group including Smith to observe outflows (Principal Investigator: John Bally, Colorado).

Figure 7: Synthetic snapshots of the outflows from young stars derived from supercomputer simulations in order to predict the detectable structures from the IRAC Camera on board the Spitzer Space telescope. The Figure shows the same molecular outflow rotated by different amounts, , about the horizontal axis.


next up previous contents
Next: Stellar Outflows and Shocks Up: M.D. Smith Previous: Low-Mass Star Formation   Contents